January 2019 Health Newsletter

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Current Articles

» Stay Healthy
» Your Feet
» Adrenal Fatigue
» Posture
» Your Core!
» Metabolic Syndrome?
» Brain Chemicals
» How Chiropractic Care Can Help Relieve “Forward Head Posture”
» Kids Aren’t the Only Ones Who Need Less Screen Time
» Over One-Quarter of the Entire World’s Population Doesn’t Get Enough Exercise

Stay Healthy

Hi. I was thinking about what to say this month and frankly speaking there has been a lot going on in the world of healthcare. Debates about who should be covered. Who should pay? Is health care a right?

 

I dont pretend to have all the answers. I only have my opinion. The system is broken. Malpractice suits cause Doctors to charge more to then be able to pay the insurance premiums. Insurance companies are profit minded, not health minded. They want profits for their shareholders. The government is divided and uses the issue for its own political agenda. Its a mess and I am sure this is not news to you and merely a recap.

 

We need to consider and adopt strategies to stay healthy so you only need to use your health insurance in an emergency. What to do? Get Adjusted. Get Acupuncture. Get massages. Eat properly. Get some exercise. Drink plenty of water. Avoid artifiical stuff.

 

Please share with me how you plan to stay healthy and I will share your ideas in the next newsletter.

 

Happy Summer,

 

Dr. Steven Saul and Staff

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2017


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Your Feet

Welcome!

How are your feet? If you want to stay in optimal alignment, you should always consider your feet first!  Each foot has 26 bones and 19 muscles. If that foundation is not solid and balanced, your entire body is affected.As soon as your feet hit the ground, signals are sent to your brain asking for coordination of muscles, tendons, ligaments, bones, fascia nd all the connections in between.

If you feet do not follow the proper path, it will put more pressure on your knees and then your hips sockets get involved which lead to spinal problems.

As summer approaches, more and more people wear shoes with little or no support for their arches. Traditionally, flip flops have been enemy number one. Till now!

 I recently found and have a display of great flip flops and slides that really suport normal foot/gait path! Finally a flip flop I can recommend!! Call Lily if you have questions. These really are the most supportive and comfortable flip flops and slides I have ever worn.

If you have foot trouble, let me know and I can evaluate you for pronation/supination and of course if you need to see a Podiatrist, we can recommend that as well.

 

 

 

All the best,

 

Dr. Saul

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2017


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Adrenal Fatigue
Are you suffering with Adrenal fatigue? Here are the common signs.
1. Difficulty getting up in the morning.
2. Mid morning low.
3. You feel better after the noon meal.
4. You have an afternoon low.
5. You feel better from 6 to 9:30 pm and get a second wind from 11pm to 1:30am.
6. You feel better if you can sleep in an extra 2 hours in the morning.

Other common signs are low bloods sugar or hypoglycemia, craving sweets and/or salty foods, difficulty sleeping, lowered libido, taking longer to recover from illness or stress, respiratory problems that come back too soon, a feeling of overwhelm or mild depression and difficulty concentrating
There are multiple causes of adrenal fatigue, but the most common is prolonged periods of stress or acute injuries like auto accidents.

The good news is that we can help. If you think you are suffering from adrenal fatigue, call us to see if we can provide a way back to being the person you know yourself to be!

The most common groups of people who suffer from this are caregivers, social workers, police, doctors, nurses, single moms, lawyers and people working 2 jobs. Self employed people are likely candidates as well.
 

All the best,

Dr. Saul



Author: Dr. Steven Saul via Dr. James L Wilson
Source: ChiroEco No9 6/13
Copyright: Dr Steven Saul 2013


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Posture

Many of us are getting into terrible positions on our cell phones and computers. It is going to be more important than ever to make sure we get into good posture!

When I was growing up I was told "Chest out, stomach in, shoulders back, etc, etc". The problem is that following that advice caused a lot of tension in my body.

Here is how to get in good posture. Stand up. Allow you head to float up toward the ceiling. Or if you like, imagine that a hook at the top of your head is pulling your head toward the ceiling. Don't force it. Let is rise or float up.

Next, find the area under the front of your sternum (breastbone).  Its about the height of the crease of your elbow.

Now find your belly button. When you bend over, these 2 points will get closer. What we want is for these to points to get further apart!  This will naturally bring your shoulders back properly without tensing.

Thats it. Now you must practice this standing, walking and sitting. When you realize you are slumping, just repeat this process. Keep repeating for the rest of your life!

 

Dr. Saul

 

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2015


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Your Core!


Hi! This is so important, I may leave this up permanently!

Lets talk about Core strength. You hear this term a lot. So what exactly is your core? Here is what you need to know.

You are made of Bones, Muscles, Tendons, Ligaments, and Fascia. If there is a breakdown in any of these systems you will have a loss of function which will lead to pain and dis-ease. We evaluate your body to find out the source of the problem.


What are the Core Muscles named and why are they so Important?

 
The core is made of all the muscles that ultimately attach to the pelvis.  These muscles can be divided into two sections based on their anatomical functions. One provides stabilization and the others provide movement.

    1. Deep stabilization system
    2. Superficial movement system


Anatomically, the muscles that are deeper in the body work more to stabilize the pelvis and spine, and the muscles that are located more superficially are more important for moving the pelvis and spine.

1. Deep Stabilization System


Core Training places a lot of emphasis on working the deep muscles of the core. Research shows that the deep muscles contract first before any movement is initiated. The body is brilliant!  It is wired to be stable first before it engages action.

The deep muscles are close to the spine and pelvis and they can help to move the body, but their primary role is to stabilize the pelvis and lower back. This protects these areas and gives you a strong foundation for the upcoming activity.

The core muscles that make the deep stabilization system are:

The transversus abdominus is one of the most important core muscles. It attaches to the pubic bone and fascia in the front. It compresses the abdominal contents, thus adding stability to the lower back and pelvis.

The lumbar multifidus runs on an angle and it helps with rotational stability. Research shows that people with chronic lower back pain have significant atrophy (wasting away) of the multifidus.

The pelvic floor muscles connect the sacrum and pelvis to the pubic bone. Their primary job is to stabilize the bottom of the abdominal cavity. The pelvis floor works with the transversus abdominus and multifidus to stabilize the pelvis. Kegel exercises are a great way to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles.

The diaphragm is the main respiratory muscle. It attaches to the ribs and spine. The diaphragm also forms the roof of the abdominal cavity, so it stabilizes the top of the abdominal cavity.

The internal oblique is the deeper of the 2 oblique muscles. It runs on an angle from the pelvis up to the ribs. Its primary role is in stabilizing the core, but it also helps to move the spine.

The transverso-spinalis muscles focus on segmental stability of the spine because they span just a few vertebrae in length. These muscles are also important for rotational stability.

All of the deep core muscles are important. When you perform exercises that require your spine to be stable, you challenge these core muscles. The plank exercise  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kiA9j-dR0oM, bridges, alternate arm and leg raises, and the drawing in maneuver are examples of exercises that can increase core stability. Any exercise or piece of equipment that requires your muscles to work harder to keep your spine stable will increase the muscle work in the deep stabilization system of the core.

2) Superficial Movement System


When the pelvis moves, the hips move, and when the hip move, the lower back moves. If the pelvis is stable, the lower back and hip are stable, so any muscle that attaches to the pelvis is part of the core as well.

The latissimus dorsi (lats), which helps you do pull ups, is most often thought of as a back and shoulder muscle, but it also attaches to the upper border of the hip bone, (pelvis), lumbar vertebrae, thoracic vertebrae, and ribs. The lats can help to tilt the pelvis forwards or to the side, and it can negatively affect lower back posture when tight and inflexible.

The erector spinae are the group of muscles that people most commonly think of when they talk about lower back muscles. They are a group of superficial muscles that run the entire length of the spine. As the name suggests, these muscles help to keep the spine erect and they also pull the spine backwards. Every lower back exercise will place some emphasis on the erector spinae muscles.

The iliopsoas is the main hip flexor muscle. It attaches to the front of the lumbar spine and pelvis. It is primarily responsible for bending the hip, but it can also help to stabilize the pelvis, lower back, and hip.

The adductors are the muscles of the inner thigh. Most people don't think of the inner thigh muscles as core muscles, but all of the adductor muscles attach to the pubic bone, which is the front part of the pelvis. Because they attach to the pubic bone they can help to stabilize the pelvis, especially when standing on 1 leg.

The hip abductors (gluteus medius and minimus) also attach to the pelvis. The gluteus medius and minimus are very important for hip stability, and they are especially important for stabilizing the hip and pelvis when standing on one leg. This is one of the reasons I say that balance exercises are so important in core training.

The hamstrings are the muscles on the back of the thigh, and they attach to the bottom of the pelvis. Strong hamstrings can help to anchor and stabilize the pelvis, and tight inflexible hamstrings can pull on the pelvis and negatively affect lower back posture.

The gluteus maximus is the largest muscle in the body and it attaches to the back of the pelvis. It extends thigh at the hip, and assists in laterally rotating the thigh. It works with the hamstrings to move the pelvis and also helps to stabilize the pelvis. Bridges can be considered a core exercise because it works the glutes while keeping the spine stable.

The external obliques attach to the ribs and pelvis but they are located superficially compared to the internal obliques. The external obliques are designed slightly more for moving the spine than stabilizing, but the external obliques  also help to stabilize the pelvis and lower back.

The rectus abdominus (6 pack)
is probably the most popular core muscle. It runs down the front of the spine, and it is the main muscle for flexing and bending. It is the main muscle for core exercises such as crunches and sit-ups.

So, what exercises, will help strengthen your core? Primarily we recommend yoga..http://www.springsyoga.com

and Pilates. We also know some private instructors if you need one. Just give us a call.


Dr. Saul and Staff


Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Internet Articles ,Kinetic Spine and Sports
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2012


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Metabolic Syndrome?

Metabolic syndrome is a disorder of energy utilization and storage, diagnosed by a co-occurrence of 3 out of five of the following medical conditions: abdominal (central) obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting plasma glucose, high serum triglycerides, and low high-density cholesterol (HDL) levels. Some studies have shown the prevalence  in the USA to be an estimated 34% of the adult population, and the prevalence increases with age.

Metabolic syndrome is also known as metabolic syndrome X, cardiometabolic syndrome, syndrome X, insulin resistance syndrome, Reaven's syndrome, and CHAOS (in Australia).

Metabolic syndrome and prediabetes appears to be the same disorder, just diagnosed by a different set of biomarkers.

Your risk for heart disease, diabetes, and stroke increases with the number of metabolic risk factors you have. In general, a person who has metabolic syndrome is twice as likely to develop heart disease and five times as likely to develop diabetes as someone who doesn't have metabolic syndrome.

If you think you have this condition, we can help! Call us for information on the best supplements and dietary changes to help this condition!

All the best,
Dr. Saul

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Wikipedia, NIH
Copyright: Wikipedia, NIH 2014


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Brain Chemicals

Are you feeling more depressed than you think you should? Has your get up and go, got up and went? If so, you may be low in particular brain chemicals like Serotonin, GABA, Tyrosine or DPA.

Low Serotonin will make you feel like you are living under a dark cloud, while low tyrosine( an amino acid) will leave you feeling like you have the blah's. You may feel stressed out and could use some GABA (Gamma Amino Butyric Acid). GABA acts to make the body more tranquil.  If you feel too sensitive to life's pains, you may be low in endorphins. This can be raised by a supplement call DPA. The good new is that these supplements may work as well or better than the common anti-depressants you see on TV with less side-effects!

If you would like to find out more, call LIly and she will send you the brain chemical analysis worksheet.

All the best,

Dr., Saul

PS..My son is getting married on Saturday the 5th of October and I am excited!

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul, The Mood Cure, Julia Ross
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2013


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How Chiropractic Care Can Help Relieve “Forward Head Posture”

If you spend a lot of time at the computer or looking down at your smartphone, you may be dealing with "forward head posture." Fortunately, this condition can be corrected with the right chiropractic care which often includes therapeutic exercises and stretches. 
What Is Forward Head Posture?
Forward head posture refers to when our head is not positioned properly over the body and is too far forward. This is typically caused by too much screen time in today’s computerized world although spending too much time at a desk or writing by hand, knitting or sewing could also cause an issue over time. Our head should be balanced on the top of our neck. This is often described as how a golf ball sits on top of a tee. The ears should be in line with the shoulders, not in front. The neck has a natural "C" curve when viewed from the side when the head is in the proper position. When the head is too far forward, that natural "C" curve can be reduced or lost increasing the tension on the structures of the neck and upper back. This can cause the upper back to become excessively curved in it's natural reversed "C" shape resulting in a condition called "kyphosis." When forward head posture becomes the norm for your body, it can lead to chronic neck pain, headaches, and spinal disc problems.
The Solution for Forward Head Posture
Fortunately, chiropractic care can significantly help. Additionally, many chiropractors not only utilize chiropractic-specific spinal adjustments to help correct these postural abnormalities, but additionally employ the use of in-office and/or at home therapeutic exercise regimen. If you are suffering from headaches, neck pain, or shoulder pain or discomfort, contact us today for a no-obligation evaluation.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JMPT: July–August, 2018 Volume 41, Issue 6, Pages 530–539.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


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Kids Aren’t the Only Ones Who Need Less Screen Time

A new doctor-authored resource for parents has some surprising news: Parents should limit their own screen time as well as their kids'. Here's why: Kids often mirror their parents' words and actions. According to Dr. Jenny Radesky, a co-writer of the resource in JAMA Pediatrics, this includes how parents interact with their smartphones – and how often. Dr. Radesky's research on the subject has revealed that parents preoccupied with their phones typically engage in less one-on-one interactions with their children, have more parent-child conflicts, and run into more behavioral issues with their kids. She also cites previous studies on TV-watching and parenting with similar results – parents who watched more television had kids who watched more television. Luckily, the parental resource Radesky co-authored with Dr. Megan Moreno has some suggestions for limiting your screen time and strengthening your family relationships. For instance, they recommend stepping back from your phone in instances where you would usually turn to it for stress-relief, distraction, or to avoid conflict. Instead, try something else, like breathing deeply. Engage with those around you and give them your full attention. The doctors promote establishing specific times when the whole family can unplug and do a single activity together. They also advise avoiding behaviors you wouldn’t want your kids to learn, like looking at your phone while driving your car, or ignoring others while using your phone.  In short, if you want your kids to learn good phone etiquette and safety, model it for them.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JAMA Pediatrics, online August 27, 2018.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


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Over One-Quarter of the Entire World’s Population Doesn’t Get Enough Exercise

About 1.4 billion people around the globe – about one-quarter of all the adults on earth – aren't getting enough physical activity in their day-to-day lives. According to a study from the World Health Organization, people who don't exercise enough daily are at higher risk for cancer, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, to start. To keep healthy, you need a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate activity or 75 minutes of vigorous, strenuous activity every week. According to the 2016 study, only one-third of women and one-fourth of men were not getting the recommended amounts.  The countries with the highest rates of inactivity were mostly Middle Eastern, including Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and Iraq, as well as American Samoa. Over 50% of adults in these areas were not getting enough physical activity. Meanwhile, 40% of all U.S. adults, 14% of Chinese adults, and 36% of British adults were not active enough. In addition to the high rates of inactivity, the study found that these rates are staying stagnant despite growing research that proves how vital exercise is to health. In fact, inactivity is twice as high in richer countries versus poorer ones, and even increased during the years 2001-2016 by 5%. One big reason may be because sedentary occupations are becoming the norm in richer countries, while poorer countries have more active occupations.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Lancet Glob Health 2018; 6: e1077–86.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


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