Newsletter Archives > ChiroPlanet.com Monthly Health Newsletter: December 2012 Health Newsletter

December 2012 Health Newsletter


Current Articles

» November
» Your Core!
» Steroid Shots Do Little to Improve Sciatica
» World Diabetes at Record Levels, But Half Are Undiagnosed
» Injuries Increasing for Kids Using Bounce Houses
» American Diets Vary Widely, Many Fall Short of Guidelines

November

Happy Thanksgiving! 

Its been a wonderful year and thanks go out to all our wonderful patients and the staff who take care of them! Thanks go out to the seminar leaders and instructors who continue to inspires us to know more ways to help you. Thanks and love to our families for helping us to help YOU to the best of our abilities!

We feel extremely blessed to be in a profession that heals and contributes to your ongoing wellness. We are blessed to know each and every one of you Thanks for your support, your referrals, and your online acknowledgements.

All the best,

ENJOY!

Dr. Steven Saul



Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul
Copyright: Dr Steven Saul 2012


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Your Core!


Hi! This is so important, I may leave this up permanently!

Lets talk about Core strength. You hear this term a lot. So what exactly is your core? Here is what you need to know.

You are made of Bones, Muscles, Tendons, Ligaments, and Fascia. If there is a breakdown in any of these systems you will have a loss of function which will lead to pain and dis-ease. We evaluate your body to find out the source of the problem.


What are the Core Muscles named and why are they so Important?

 
The core is made of all the muscles that ultimately attach to the pelvis.  These muscles can be divided into two sections based on their anatomical functions. One provides stabilization and the others provide movement.

    1. Deep stabilization system
    2. Superficial movement system


Anatomically, the muscles that are deeper in the body work more to stabilize the pelvis and spine, and the muscles that are located more superficially are more important for moving the pelvis and spine.

1. Deep Stabilization System


Core Training places a lot of emphasis on working the deep muscles of the core. Research shows that the deep muscles contract first before any movement is initiated. The body is brilliant!  It is wired to be stable first before it engages action.

The deep muscles are close to the spine and pelvis and they can help to move the body, but their primary role is to stabilize the pelvis and lower back. This protects these areas and gives you a strong foundation for the upcoming activity.

The core muscles that make the deep stabilization system are:

The transversus abdominus is one of the most important core muscles. It attaches to the pubic bone and fascia in the front. It compresses the abdominal contents, thus adding stability to the lower back and pelvis.

The lumbar multifidus runs on an angle and it helps with rotational stability. Research shows that people with chronic lower back pain have significant atrophy (wasting away) of the multifidus.

The pelvic floor muscles connect the sacrum and pelvis to the pubic bone. Their primary job is to stabilize the bottom of the abdominal cavity. The pelvis floor works with the transversus abdominus and multifidus to stabilize the pelvis. Kegel exercises are a great way to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles.

The diaphragm is the main respiratory muscle. It attaches to the ribs and spine. The diaphragm also forms the roof of the abdominal cavity, so it stabilizes the top of the abdominal cavity.

The internal oblique is the deeper of the 2 oblique muscles. It runs on an angle from the pelvis up to the ribs. Its primary role is in stabilizing the core, but it also helps to move the spine.

The transverso-spinalis muscles focus on segmental stability of the spine because they span just a few vertebrae in length. These muscles are also important for rotational stability.

All of the deep core muscles are important. When you perform exercises that require your spine to be stable, you challenge these core muscles. The plank exercise  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kiA9j-dR0oM, bridges, alternate arm and leg raises, and the drawing in maneuver are examples of exercises that can increase core stability. Any exercise or piece of equipment that requires your muscles to work harder to keep your spine stable will increase the muscle work in the deep stabilization system of the core.

2) Superficial Movement System


When the pelvis moves, the hips move, and when the hip move, the lower back moves. If the pelvis is stable, the lower back and hip are stable, so any muscle that attaches to the pelvis is part of the core as well.

The latissimus dorsi (lats), which helps you do pull ups, is most often thought of as a back and shoulder muscle, but it also attaches to the upper border of the hip bone, (pelvis), lumbar vertebrae, thoracic vertebrae, and ribs. The lats can help to tilt the pelvis forwards or to the side, and it can negatively affect lower back posture when tight and inflexible.

The erector spinae are the group of muscles that people most commonly think of when they talk about lower back muscles. They are a group of superficial muscles that run the entire length of the spine. As the name suggests, these muscles help to keep the spine erect and they also pull the spine backwards. Every lower back exercise will place some emphasis on the erector spinae muscles.

The iliopsoas is the main hip flexor muscle. It attaches to the front of the lumbar spine and pelvis. It is primarily responsible for bending the hip, but it can also help to stabilize the pelvis, lower back, and hip.

The adductors are the muscles of the inner thigh. Most people don't think of the inner thigh muscles as core muscles, but all of the adductor muscles attach to the pubic bone, which is the front part of the pelvis. Because they attach to the pubic bone they can help to stabilize the pelvis, especially when standing on 1 leg.

The hip abductors (gluteus medius and minimus) also attach to the pelvis. The gluteus medius and minimus are very important for hip stability, and they are especially important for stabilizing the hip and pelvis when standing on one leg. This is one of the reasons I say that balance exercises are so important in core training.

The hamstrings are the muscles on the back of the thigh, and they attach to the bottom of the pelvis. Strong hamstrings can help to anchor and stabilize the pelvis, and tight inflexible hamstrings can pull on the pelvis and negatively affect lower back posture.

The gluteus maximus is the largest muscle in the body and it attaches to the back of the pelvis. It extends thigh at the hip, and assists in laterally rotating the thigh. It works with the hamstrings to move the pelvis and also helps to stabilize the pelvis. Bridges can be considered a core exercise because it works the glutes while keeping the spine stable.

The external obliques attach to the ribs and pelvis but they are located superficially compared to the internal obliques. The external obliques are designed slightly more for moving the spine than stabilizing, but the external obliques  also help to stabilize the pelvis and lower back.

The rectus abdominus (6 pack)
is probably the most popular core muscle. It runs down the front of the spine, and it is the main muscle for flexing and bending. It is the main muscle for core exercises such as crunches and sit-ups.

So, what exercises, will help strengthen your core? Primarily we recommend yoga..http://www.springsyoga.com

and Pilates. We also know some private instructors if you need one. Just give us a call.


Dr. Saul and Staff


Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Internet Articles ,Kinetic Spine and Sports
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2012


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Steroid Shots Do Little to Improve Sciatica

A recent Australian medical study found that spinal injections of corticosteroids had no measurable effect on sciatica pain. Sciatica is a common symptom that consists of leg pain caused by nerve irritation or impingement of the spinal nerve roots of the lower back and/or the sciatic nerve itself. In randomized controlled trials, researchers found little difference in the relief offered by the injections and a placebo. After analyzing results from nearly two dozen clinical trials involving thousands of sciatica patients, they concluded that the shots did little to help. Despite this, in recent years the use of epidural steroid injections to treat back pain has soared from 741,000 in 2000 to approximately 1,438,000 in 2004. In the U.S., corticosteroid shots are expensive, often costing hundreds of dollars per shot. Recently, a tainted supply of a steroid included in the trials was tied to a nationwide outbreak of fungal meningitis that infected 400 people and led to 31 deaths. The researchers concluded that sciatica patients should consult with their physician and consider alternate forms of treatment, including chiropractic care and only in extreme cases, surgery.



Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Annals of Internal Medicine, online November 13, 2012.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2012


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World Diabetes at Record Levels, But Half Are Undiagnosed

A new report published by the International Diabetes Federation puts the worldwide number of people living with diabetes at 371 million, up from 366 million a year ago. The IDF estimates that of that number, 187 million people do not yet know they are suffering from the condition. Limited access to healthcare in developing nations often means the disease goes undiagnosed. While often viewed as primarily a Western problem, diabetes is spreading rapidly in poorer countries; four out of five diabetics now live in low and middle-income countries. Treatment of diabetes in these countries is often more difficult, especially when it comes to insulin, which requires refrigeration to prevent deterioration. The report projects that over 552 million people will have developed diabetes by 2030. Untreated, the disease can lead to serious complications, including blindness, nerve and kidney damage. Worldwide, over 4.8 million people a year die from diabetes, making it one of a number of health conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, that healthcare campaigners want included in the next set of global development goals.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Reuters. November 14, 2012.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2012


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Injuries Increasing for Kids Using Bounce Houses

Experts recently reported that the number of children in the US injured while using inflatable bounce houses has increased to 15 times 1995 levels. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, found that there are now approximately five injuries annually per 100,000 children. While the bounce-related injuries are much lower than trampoline injuries, the researchers point out that the study allows parents to make informed decisions. The number of kids being brought into emergency rooms for bounce-related accidents increased from 702 in 1995 to 11,311 children in 2010. The rise in the rate of injuries was attributed both to an increase in the use of the inflatable toys and better reporting of mishaps. Injuries reported included, broken bones, sprains, contusions, cuts and bruises. Researchers suggest parents follow simple guidelines when children use bounce houses to minimize risk, including limiting use to children 6 years old and older, limiting the number of children using them to at one time and only allowing use with adult supervision.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Pediatrics, online November 26, 2012.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2012


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American Diets Vary Widely, Many Fall Short of Guidelines

A new survey of 8,272 Americans’ eating habits, unsurprisingly confirms that many in the US fall short of nutritional recommendations. The study, conducted by the USDA's Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, compared what people said they ate to nutritional guidelines published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The study’s authors found that children and the elderly generally ate a healthier diet than younger and middle aged adults, and that women ate better than men. Differences were also noted along racial lines, with Hispanics generally enjoying higher-quality diets than blacks or whites. Similarly, income appeared to play a factor, as higher income adults generally met more of the guidelines. No group, however, came close to meeting all of the recommendations. In recent years, the American diet has come under close scrutiny, due to an explosion in the public rates of obesity, diabetes and heart-disease. The researchers suggest Americans eat more fruits and vegetables and increase their levels of physical exercise.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, online November 19, 2012.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2012


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