Newsletter Archives > ChiroPlanet.com Monthly Health Newsletter: February 2013 Health Newsletter

February 2013 Health Newsletter


Current Articles

» Yoga May Improve Common Heart Ailment
» Baby Boomers in Poorer Health than Previous Generation
» Baby Boomer’s Back Pain and Costs Increasing
» Lumbar Surgery Less Likely For Chiropractic Patients
» Your Core!

Yoga May Improve Common Heart Ailment

The University of Kansas Medical Center recently reported that regular yoga classes appeared to decrease occurrences of a common heart condition known as atrial fibrillation in patients, as well as decreasing stress and improving their overall well-being. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a condition in which the heart's upper chambers quiver chaotically instead of contracting normally. The attacks are painful and often prevent the patients from enjoying regular activities. People with AF are often prescribed drugs such as beta blockers to help control their heart rate and rhythm, but the medicines don't alleviate symptoms for all patients. The American Heart Association estimates that about 2.7 million people in the U.S. have the heart condition. The new study included 49 people who'd had atrial fibrillation for an average of five years. Researchers began by tracking study volunteers' heart symptoms, blood pressure and heart rate, as well as their anxiety, depression and general quality of life. The participants then went to group yoga classes at least twice a week for three months, again reporting on their symptoms and quality of life. All of the patients were on stable medications throughout the study period. The patients reported a 50 percent drop of AF occurrences, which was also confirmed by heart monitors. Anxiety scores declined from an average of 34, on a scale of 20 to 80, to 25 after three months of yoga. Reported depression and general mental health improved as well. The researchers pointed out that the classes may make their arrhythmia "more tolerable" and reduce visits to the emergency room when symptoms flare up. However, the classes were not suggested as an alternative to regular medical care.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2013. doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2012.11.060
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2013


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Baby Boomers in Poorer Health than Previous Generation

A new comparison study finds members of the Baby Boomer generation are getting less exercise and feeling worse than their parents did when at the same age. Baby boomers are generally defined as the generation born in the two decades after World War Two. Demographically, they are the largest portion of the American public by age group. In a national survey, approximately 13 percent of baby boomers reported being in "excellent" health in middle age, compared to 32 percent of the previous generation who said the same at the same stage of life. The study, conducted at the West Virginia University School of Medicine, used data from a continuing national health survey to compare the answers of people who were 46 to 64 years old between 1988 and 1994, and the baby boomers who were in the same age range between 2007 and 2010. The researchers noted a 10 percent increase in obesity between the generations and a four percent increase in diabetes. The baby boomers were also more likely to have high cholesterol and high blood pressure. More surprisingly, the researchers noted that twice as many boomers needed a cane or walker to remain mobile, compared to the previous generation. A bright spot for the baby boomers was their decrease in smoking, which led to a decline in emphysema and other smoking-related illnesses. However, the researchers were quick to point out that the majority of baby boomers needed to exercise more and eat healthier to avoid further health complications.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JAMA Internal Medicine, online February 4, 2013.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2013


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Baby Boomer’s Back Pain and Costs Increasing

As the generation known as the 'Baby Boomers' ages, it comes as no surprise that their back pain is increasing. What is surprising is the increased cost of treating that pain. A wide-scope study, recently published in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, determined that the occurrence of back pain in patients aged 45 - 60 increased by 29 percent. Patients whose back pain was described as chronic increased by 64 percent. This increase in back pain in both patient groups was attributed to simple aging. However, the inflation-adjusted costs to treat these patients soared 129 percent, from $15.6 billion in 2000 to 2001 to $35.7 billion in 2006 to 2007. The researchers concluded that the rising trends in back pain and treatment cost will only continue or accelerate under existing treatment patterns. Suggested improvements included prioritizing health policy, clinical practice, and research efforts to improve care outcomes, cost-effectiveness and health workforce planning. Fortunately, chiropractic care has been shown to be a cost effective option when treating back pain. If you are suffering from back pain or another musculoskeletal ailment, call your local chiropractor today. Setting up a no-obligation consultation is usually quick, easy and is often provided at little to no cost.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JMPT. Volume 36, Issue 1, Pages 2-11, January 2013.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2013


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Lumbar Surgery Less Likely For Chiropractic Patients

A new study, recently published in the medical journal Spine, found that patients who seek chiropractic care for back pain are far less likely to undergo lumbar surgery than those who consult a surgeon. The study found that approximately 43 percent of patients who saw a surgeon first when seeking treatment for back pain ended up having surgery, as opposed to 1.5 percent of patients who first saw a chiropractor. These findings support the long held position that many health care providers subscribe to that attempting to treat back pain should start with conservative approaches, such as chiropractic care. The study pointed out that the treatments were often more beneficial to patients and far more cost-effective. As musculoskeletal conditions and low-back pain have been identified as the second leading cause of disability worldwide, it has become a top priority to health care experts to create effective and affordable strategies to deal with the rising burden of non-fatal disabilities. "As governments and health systems around the globe search for answers to complicated health challenges such as rising numbers of chronically ill and disabled patients and runaway costs, research is finally demonstrating what the chiropractic profession has promoted for years: that caring for patients with conservative treatments first, before moving on to less conservative options or unnecessary drugs and surgery, is a sensible and cost-effective strategy," said American Chiropractic Association President Keith Overland, DC.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Spine. December 12, 2012.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2013


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Your Core!


Hi! This is so important, I may leave this up permanently!

Lets talk about Core strength. You hear this term a lot. So what exactly is your core? Here is what you need to know.

You are made of Bones, Muscles, Tendons, Ligaments, and Fascia. If there is a breakdown in any of these systems you will have a loss of function which will lead to pain and dis-ease. We evaluate your body to find out the source of the problem.


What are the Core Muscles named and why are they so Important?

 
The core is made of all the muscles that ultimately attach to the pelvis.  These muscles can be divided into two sections based on their anatomical functions. One provides stabilization and the others provide movement.

    1. Deep stabilization system
    2. Superficial movement system


Anatomically, the muscles that are deeper in the body work more to stabilize the pelvis and spine, and the muscles that are located more superficially are more important for moving the pelvis and spine.

1. Deep Stabilization System


Core Training places a lot of emphasis on working the deep muscles of the core. Research shows that the deep muscles contract first before any movement is initiated. The body is brilliant!  It is wired to be stable first before it engages action.

The deep muscles are close to the spine and pelvis and they can help to move the body, but their primary role is to stabilize the pelvis and lower back. This protects these areas and gives you a strong foundation for the upcoming activity.

The core muscles that make the deep stabilization system are:

The transversus abdominus is one of the most important core muscles. It attaches to the pubic bone and fascia in the front. It compresses the abdominal contents, thus adding stability to the lower back and pelvis.

The lumbar multifidus runs on an angle and it helps with rotational stability. Research shows that people with chronic lower back pain have significant atrophy (wasting away) of the multifidus.

The pelvic floor muscles connect the sacrum and pelvis to the pubic bone. Their primary job is to stabilize the bottom of the abdominal cavity. The pelvis floor works with the transversus abdominus and multifidus to stabilize the pelvis. Kegel exercises are a great way to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles.

The diaphragm is the main respiratory muscle. It attaches to the ribs and spine. The diaphragm also forms the roof of the abdominal cavity, so it stabilizes the top of the abdominal cavity.

The internal oblique is the deeper of the 2 oblique muscles. It runs on an angle from the pelvis up to the ribs. Its primary role is in stabilizing the core, but it also helps to move the spine.

The transverso-spinalis muscles focus on segmental stability of the spine because they span just a few vertebrae in length. These muscles are also important for rotational stability.

All of the deep core muscles are important. When you perform exercises that require your spine to be stable, you challenge these core muscles. The plank exercise  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kiA9j-dR0oM, bridges, alternate arm and leg raises, and the drawing in maneuver are examples of exercises that can increase core stability. Any exercise or piece of equipment that requires your muscles to work harder to keep your spine stable will increase the muscle work in the deep stabilization system of the core.

2) Superficial Movement System


When the pelvis moves, the hips move, and when the hip move, the lower back moves. If the pelvis is stable, the lower back and hip are stable, so any muscle that attaches to the pelvis is part of the core as well.

The latissimus dorsi (lats), which helps you do pull ups, is most often thought of as a back and shoulder muscle, but it also attaches to the upper border of the hip bone, (pelvis), lumbar vertebrae, thoracic vertebrae, and ribs. The lats can help to tilt the pelvis forwards or to the side, and it can negatively affect lower back posture when tight and inflexible.

The erector spinae are the group of muscles that people most commonly think of when they talk about lower back muscles. They are a group of superficial muscles that run the entire length of the spine. As the name suggests, these muscles help to keep the spine erect and they also pull the spine backwards. Every lower back exercise will place some emphasis on the erector spinae muscles.

The iliopsoas is the main hip flexor muscle. It attaches to the front of the lumbar spine and pelvis. It is primarily responsible for bending the hip, but it can also help to stabilize the pelvis, lower back, and hip.

The adductors are the muscles of the inner thigh. Most people don't think of the inner thigh muscles as core muscles, but all of the adductor muscles attach to the pubic bone, which is the front part of the pelvis. Because they attach to the pubic bone they can help to stabilize the pelvis, especially when standing on 1 leg.

The hip abductors (gluteus medius and minimus) also attach to the pelvis. The gluteus medius and minimus are very important for hip stability, and they are especially important for stabilizing the hip and pelvis when standing on one leg. This is one of the reasons I say that balance exercises are so important in core training.

The hamstrings are the muscles on the back of the thigh, and they attach to the bottom of the pelvis. Strong hamstrings can help to anchor and stabilize the pelvis, and tight inflexible hamstrings can pull on the pelvis and negatively affect lower back posture.

The gluteus maximus is the largest muscle in the body and it attaches to the back of the pelvis. It extends thigh at the hip, and assists in laterally rotating the thigh. It works with the hamstrings to move the pelvis and also helps to stabilize the pelvis. Bridges can be considered a core exercise because it works the glutes while keeping the spine stable.

The external obliques attach to the ribs and pelvis but they are located superficially compared to the internal obliques. The external obliques are designed slightly more for moving the spine than stabilizing, but the external obliques  also help to stabilize the pelvis and lower back.

The rectus abdominus (6 pack)
is probably the most popular core muscle. It runs down the front of the spine, and it is the main muscle for flexing and bending. It is the main muscle for core exercises such as crunches and sit-ups.

So, what exercises, will help strengthen your core? Primarily we recommend yoga..http://www.springsyoga.com

and Pilates. We also know some private instructors if you need one. Just give us a call.


Dr. Saul and Staff


Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Internet Articles ,Kinetic Spine and Sports
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2012


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