Newsletter Archives > ChiroPlanet.com Monthly Health Newsletter: July 2013 Health Newsletter

July 2013 Health Newsletter


Current Articles

» Vegetarians May Live Longer
» Summer Workouts Require Adjustments For Heat
» Focus When Lifting To Reduce Back Injuries
» More Than Half Suffering From Untreated Back, Neck Pain
» Your Core!
» Adrenal Fatigue

Vegetarians May Live Longer

A five year study of people's eating habits suggests that people who limit or eliminate meat from their diets are less likely to die over time. Researchers at Loma Linda University in California studied data from over 70,000 participants and found that people who eat mostly fruits and vegetables enjoyed a reduced risk of heart disease and other diet-related causes of death. In the test group, 8 percent of subjects described themselves as vegans who didn't eat any animal products, 29 percent were lacto-ovo-vegetarians who didn't eat fish or meat but did eat dairy and egg products, and 15 percent occasionally ate meat and fish. The researchers found that while seven out of 1000 individuals died in any given period of time, the death rate among vegetarians and occasional meat-eaters dropped to five or six individuals in the same time period. However, the researchers were reluctant to attribute the effect solely to the test subject's diet choices. They pointed out that the vegetarians also generally worked out more, were better educated, less likely to smoke and weighed less, all of which contributed to their decreased mortality rate. Still, they concluded that the data suggests that reducing or eliminating animal products from your diet could lead to healthier overall outcomes.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JAMA Internal Medicine, online June 3, 2013.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2013


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Summer Workouts Require Adjustments For Heat

Fitness buffs are familiar with the difficulties summer can pose when working out. As temperatures rise, it can be difficult to maintain a workout routine. However, experts advise the best way to deal with the heat is to reduce the impact of your exercise routine and give yourself time to acclimate to it. Researchers from the American Council on Exercise report that the average, healthy individual needs 10-14 days to fully acclimate to exercising in increased temperatures. They advise that the only way to do that is to embrace the heat and continue to exercise. After your body has adjusted to the new temperatures, individuals sweat sooner, have a lower core temperature and heart rate response, and are at a reduced risk for dehydration. Experts caution that during the acclimation period, it's important to adjust the strenuousness of your workouts and be aware of the increased risks. But, while approximately 25 percent of individuals report being heat-intolerant when the season begins, that number drops to 2 percent after the acclimation period, according to experts. Unfortunately, the increased tolerance to heat is easy to lose. Experts estimate that for every two days you fail to exercise in the heat, one day of acclimation is lost, thus after a two week break, you are back at square one with the acclimation process.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Reuters. July 8, 2013.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2013


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Focus When Lifting To Reduce Back Injuries

New research indicates stress, mental fatigue and lack of focus all make you susceptible to back injuries during periods of heavy lifting and high stress spinal movements. The study, conducted by the International University of Health and Welfare in Japan and published in the medical journal Spine, used a 3D motion analysis system and four force plates to record kinetic data while inviting subjects to lift a box off the ground. Subjects were required to lift the box while solving arithmetic problems and again without the mental calculations. Interestingly, while solving the math problems the research subjects exhibited poor trunk and pelvis angles for squat and stoop postures which resulted in increased low back load. The researchers concluded that the increased load increased the risk of back injuries and helped to explain the effect of ergonomic demands of lifting tasks, as well as psychosocial factors responsible for the onset of disabling back pain. They recommended that individuals reduce the risks by focusing on the task and avoiding heavy lifting when fatigued or distracted.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Spine: 01 June 2013 - Volume 38 - Issue 13 - p E832–E839.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2013


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More Than Half Suffering From Untreated Back, Neck Pain

A newly published study in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics suggests that one-half to two-thirds of the population suffer from recurring back or neck pain. Researchers conducted face-to-face interviews with over 1000 Croatian participants, roughly split along male and female lines. They found that nearly 67 percent of women and 63 percent of men reported experiencing back pain. Further, 58 percent of women and 54 percent of men reported recurring neck pain. After tallying the combined results the researchers concluded that approximately half to two-thirds of the research subjects experienced frequent untreated pain that impacted the quality of their lives. Research indicates that most back and neck aliments are far better addressed by non-invasive treatments like chiropractic care than by traditional surgical remedies. Also, research has shown chiropractic care to be less expensive, far less dangerous and more effective than surgery as a treatment for the majority of these issues.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JMPT. Volume 36, Issue 5, Pages 267-275, June 2013.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2013


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Your Core!


Hi! This is so important, I may leave this up permanently!

Lets talk about Core strength. You hear this term a lot. So what exactly is your core? Here is what you need to know.

You are made of Bones, Muscles, Tendons, Ligaments, and Fascia. If there is a breakdown in any of these systems you will have a loss of function which will lead to pain and dis-ease. We evaluate your body to find out the source of the problem.


What are the Core Muscles named and why are they so Important?

 
The core is made of all the muscles that ultimately attach to the pelvis.  These muscles can be divided into two sections based on their anatomical functions. One provides stabilization and the others provide movement.

    1. Deep stabilization system
    2. Superficial movement system


Anatomically, the muscles that are deeper in the body work more to stabilize the pelvis and spine, and the muscles that are located more superficially are more important for moving the pelvis and spine.

1. Deep Stabilization System


Core Training places a lot of emphasis on working the deep muscles of the core. Research shows that the deep muscles contract first before any movement is initiated. The body is brilliant!  It is wired to be stable first before it engages action.

The deep muscles are close to the spine and pelvis and they can help to move the body, but their primary role is to stabilize the pelvis and lower back. This protects these areas and gives you a strong foundation for the upcoming activity.

The core muscles that make the deep stabilization system are:

The transversus abdominus is one of the most important core muscles. It attaches to the pubic bone and fascia in the front. It compresses the abdominal contents, thus adding stability to the lower back and pelvis.

The lumbar multifidus runs on an angle and it helps with rotational stability. Research shows that people with chronic lower back pain have significant atrophy (wasting away) of the multifidus.

The pelvic floor muscles connect the sacrum and pelvis to the pubic bone. Their primary job is to stabilize the bottom of the abdominal cavity. The pelvis floor works with the transversus abdominus and multifidus to stabilize the pelvis. Kegel exercises are a great way to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles.

The diaphragm is the main respiratory muscle. It attaches to the ribs and spine. The diaphragm also forms the roof of the abdominal cavity, so it stabilizes the top of the abdominal cavity.

The internal oblique is the deeper of the 2 oblique muscles. It runs on an angle from the pelvis up to the ribs. Its primary role is in stabilizing the core, but it also helps to move the spine.

The transverso-spinalis muscles focus on segmental stability of the spine because they span just a few vertebrae in length. These muscles are also important for rotational stability.

All of the deep core muscles are important. When you perform exercises that require your spine to be stable, you challenge these core muscles. The plank exercise  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kiA9j-dR0oM, bridges, alternate arm and leg raises, and the drawing in maneuver are examples of exercises that can increase core stability. Any exercise or piece of equipment that requires your muscles to work harder to keep your spine stable will increase the muscle work in the deep stabilization system of the core.

2) Superficial Movement System


When the pelvis moves, the hips move, and when the hip move, the lower back moves. If the pelvis is stable, the lower back and hip are stable, so any muscle that attaches to the pelvis is part of the core as well.

The latissimus dorsi (lats), which helps you do pull ups, is most often thought of as a back and shoulder muscle, but it also attaches to the upper border of the hip bone, (pelvis), lumbar vertebrae, thoracic vertebrae, and ribs. The lats can help to tilt the pelvis forwards or to the side, and it can negatively affect lower back posture when tight and inflexible.

The erector spinae are the group of muscles that people most commonly think of when they talk about lower back muscles. They are a group of superficial muscles that run the entire length of the spine. As the name suggests, these muscles help to keep the spine erect and they also pull the spine backwards. Every lower back exercise will place some emphasis on the erector spinae muscles.

The iliopsoas is the main hip flexor muscle. It attaches to the front of the lumbar spine and pelvis. It is primarily responsible for bending the hip, but it can also help to stabilize the pelvis, lower back, and hip.

The adductors are the muscles of the inner thigh. Most people don't think of the inner thigh muscles as core muscles, but all of the adductor muscles attach to the pubic bone, which is the front part of the pelvis. Because they attach to the pubic bone they can help to stabilize the pelvis, especially when standing on 1 leg.

The hip abductors (gluteus medius and minimus) also attach to the pelvis. The gluteus medius and minimus are very important for hip stability, and they are especially important for stabilizing the hip and pelvis when standing on one leg. This is one of the reasons I say that balance exercises are so important in core training.

The hamstrings are the muscles on the back of the thigh, and they attach to the bottom of the pelvis. Strong hamstrings can help to anchor and stabilize the pelvis, and tight inflexible hamstrings can pull on the pelvis and negatively affect lower back posture.

The gluteus maximus is the largest muscle in the body and it attaches to the back of the pelvis. It extends thigh at the hip, and assists in laterally rotating the thigh. It works with the hamstrings to move the pelvis and also helps to stabilize the pelvis. Bridges can be considered a core exercise because it works the glutes while keeping the spine stable.

The external obliques attach to the ribs and pelvis but they are located superficially compared to the internal obliques. The external obliques are designed slightly more for moving the spine than stabilizing, but the external obliques  also help to stabilize the pelvis and lower back.

The rectus abdominus (6 pack)
is probably the most popular core muscle. It runs down the front of the spine, and it is the main muscle for flexing and bending. It is the main muscle for core exercises such as crunches and sit-ups.

So, what exercises, will help strengthen your core? Primarily we recommend yoga..http://www.springsyoga.com

and Pilates. We also know some private instructors if you need one. Just give us a call.


Dr. Saul and Staff


Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Internet Articles ,Kinetic Spine and Sports
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2012


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Adrenal Fatigue
Are you suffering with Adrenal fatigue? Here are the common signs.
1. Difficulty getting up in the morning.
2. Mid morning low.
3. You feel better after the noon meal.
4. You have an afternoon low.
5. You feel better from 6 to 9:30 pm and get a second wind from 11pm to 1:30am.
6. You feel better if you can sleep in an extra 2 hours in the morning.

Other common signs are low bloods sugar or hypoglycemia, craving sweets and/or salty foods, difficulty sleeping, lowered libido, taking longer to recover from illness or stress, respiratory problems that come back too soon, a feeling of overwhelm or mild depression and difficulty concentrating
There are multiple causes of adrenal fatigue, but the most common is prolonged periods of stress or acute injuries like auto accidents.

The good news is that we can help. If you think you are suffering from adrenal fatigue, call us to see if we can provide a way back to being the person you know yourself to be!

The most common groups of people who suffer from this are caregivers, social workers, police, doctors, nurses, single moms, lawyers and people working 2 jobs. Self employed people are likely candidates as well.
 

All the best,

Dr. Saul



Author: Dr. Steven Saul via Dr. James L Wilson
Source: ChiroEco No9 6/13
Copyright: Dr Steven Saul 2013


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