Newsletter Archives > ChiroPlanet.com Monthly Health Newsletter: November 2013 Health Newsletter

November 2013 Health Newsletter


Current Articles

» Happy November
» Brain Chemicals
» Adrenal Fatigue
» Your Core!
» Research, Common Sense Say Conservative Treatments Before Spinal Fusion Surgery
» "I Get Around."
» Lower Blood Pressure With Flaxseed

» Mid-Life Diets Important For Healthy Aging

Happy November

Happy November..

This time of year is when your body prepares for winter.

Drink lots of water. Take your multi-vitamins. Eat a little less to allow for the transition to winter.

Your body has to work hard to have this happen smoothly. My opinion is to do your research if you are thinking of flu shots. Read the pros and cons and make an informed decision.

I hope you have a great Thanksgiving. This is the best day to ignore everything I said earlier. Enjoy!

Dr. Saul

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2013


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Brain Chemicals

Are you feeling more depressed than you think you should? Has your get up and go, got up and went? If so, you may be low in particular brain chemicals like Serotonin, GABA, Tyrosine or DPA.

Low Serotonin will make you feel like you are living under a dark cloud, while low tyrosine( an amino acid) will leave you feeling like you have the blah's. You may feel stressed out and could use some GABA (Gamma Amino Butyric Acid). GABA acts to make the body more tranquil.  If you feel too sensitive to life's pains, you may be low in endorphins. This can be raised by a supplement call DPA. The good new is that these supplements may work as well or better than the common anti-depressants you see on TV with less side-effects!

If you would like to find out more, call LIly and she will send you the brain chemical analysis worksheet.

All the best,

Dr., Saul

PS..My son is getting married on Saturday the 5th of October and I am excited!

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul, The Mood Cure, Julia Ross
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2013


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Adrenal Fatigue
Are you suffering with Adrenal fatigue? Here are the common signs.
1. Difficulty getting up in the morning.
2. Mid morning low.
3. You feel better after the noon meal.
4. You have an afternoon low.
5. You feel better from 6 to 9:30 pm and get a second wind from 11pm to 1:30am.
6. You feel better if you can sleep in an extra 2 hours in the morning.

Other common signs are low bloods sugar or hypoglycemia, craving sweets and/or salty foods, difficulty sleeping, lowered libido, taking longer to recover from illness or stress, respiratory problems that come back too soon, a feeling of overwhelm or mild depression and difficulty concentrating
There are multiple causes of adrenal fatigue, but the most common is prolonged periods of stress or acute injuries like auto accidents.

The good news is that we can help. If you think you are suffering from adrenal fatigue, call us to see if we can provide a way back to being the person you know yourself to be!

The most common groups of people who suffer from this are caregivers, social workers, police, doctors, nurses, single moms, lawyers and people working 2 jobs. Self employed people are likely candidates as well.
 

All the best,

Dr. Saul



Author: Dr. Steven Saul via Dr. James L Wilson
Source: ChiroEco No9 6/13
Copyright: Dr Steven Saul 2013


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Your Core!


Hi! This is so important, I may leave this up permanently!

Lets talk about Core strength. You hear this term a lot. So what exactly is your core? Here is what you need to know.

You are made of Bones, Muscles, Tendons, Ligaments, and Fascia. If there is a breakdown in any of these systems you will have a loss of function which will lead to pain and dis-ease. We evaluate your body to find out the source of the problem.


What are the Core Muscles named and why are they so Important?

 
The core is made of all the muscles that ultimately attach to the pelvis.  These muscles can be divided into two sections based on their anatomical functions. One provides stabilization and the others provide movement.

    1. Deep stabilization system
    2. Superficial movement system


Anatomically, the muscles that are deeper in the body work more to stabilize the pelvis and spine, and the muscles that are located more superficially are more important for moving the pelvis and spine.

1. Deep Stabilization System


Core Training places a lot of emphasis on working the deep muscles of the core. Research shows that the deep muscles contract first before any movement is initiated. The body is brilliant!  It is wired to be stable first before it engages action.

The deep muscles are close to the spine and pelvis and they can help to move the body, but their primary role is to stabilize the pelvis and lower back. This protects these areas and gives you a strong foundation for the upcoming activity.

The core muscles that make the deep stabilization system are:

The transversus abdominus is one of the most important core muscles. It attaches to the pubic bone and fascia in the front. It compresses the abdominal contents, thus adding stability to the lower back and pelvis.

The lumbar multifidus runs on an angle and it helps with rotational stability. Research shows that people with chronic lower back pain have significant atrophy (wasting away) of the multifidus.

The pelvic floor muscles connect the sacrum and pelvis to the pubic bone. Their primary job is to stabilize the bottom of the abdominal cavity. The pelvis floor works with the transversus abdominus and multifidus to stabilize the pelvis. Kegel exercises are a great way to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles.

The diaphragm is the main respiratory muscle. It attaches to the ribs and spine. The diaphragm also forms the roof of the abdominal cavity, so it stabilizes the top of the abdominal cavity.

The internal oblique is the deeper of the 2 oblique muscles. It runs on an angle from the pelvis up to the ribs. Its primary role is in stabilizing the core, but it also helps to move the spine.

The transverso-spinalis muscles focus on segmental stability of the spine because they span just a few vertebrae in length. These muscles are also important for rotational stability.

All of the deep core muscles are important. When you perform exercises that require your spine to be stable, you challenge these core muscles. The plank exercise  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kiA9j-dR0oM, bridges, alternate arm and leg raises, and the drawing in maneuver are examples of exercises that can increase core stability. Any exercise or piece of equipment that requires your muscles to work harder to keep your spine stable will increase the muscle work in the deep stabilization system of the core.

2) Superficial Movement System


When the pelvis moves, the hips move, and when the hip move, the lower back moves. If the pelvis is stable, the lower back and hip are stable, so any muscle that attaches to the pelvis is part of the core as well.

The latissimus dorsi (lats), which helps you do pull ups, is most often thought of as a back and shoulder muscle, but it also attaches to the upper border of the hip bone, (pelvis), lumbar vertebrae, thoracic vertebrae, and ribs. The lats can help to tilt the pelvis forwards or to the side, and it can negatively affect lower back posture when tight and inflexible.

The erector spinae are the group of muscles that people most commonly think of when they talk about lower back muscles. They are a group of superficial muscles that run the entire length of the spine. As the name suggests, these muscles help to keep the spine erect and they also pull the spine backwards. Every lower back exercise will place some emphasis on the erector spinae muscles.

The iliopsoas is the main hip flexor muscle. It attaches to the front of the lumbar spine and pelvis. It is primarily responsible for bending the hip, but it can also help to stabilize the pelvis, lower back, and hip.

The adductors are the muscles of the inner thigh. Most people don't think of the inner thigh muscles as core muscles, but all of the adductor muscles attach to the pubic bone, which is the front part of the pelvis. Because they attach to the pubic bone they can help to stabilize the pelvis, especially when standing on 1 leg.

The hip abductors (gluteus medius and minimus) also attach to the pelvis. The gluteus medius and minimus are very important for hip stability, and they are especially important for stabilizing the hip and pelvis when standing on one leg. This is one of the reasons I say that balance exercises are so important in core training.

The hamstrings are the muscles on the back of the thigh, and they attach to the bottom of the pelvis. Strong hamstrings can help to anchor and stabilize the pelvis, and tight inflexible hamstrings can pull on the pelvis and negatively affect lower back posture.

The gluteus maximus is the largest muscle in the body and it attaches to the back of the pelvis. It extends thigh at the hip, and assists in laterally rotating the thigh. It works with the hamstrings to move the pelvis and also helps to stabilize the pelvis. Bridges can be considered a core exercise because it works the glutes while keeping the spine stable.

The external obliques attach to the ribs and pelvis but they are located superficially compared to the internal obliques. The external obliques are designed slightly more for moving the spine than stabilizing, but the external obliques  also help to stabilize the pelvis and lower back.

The rectus abdominus (6 pack)
is probably the most popular core muscle. It runs down the front of the spine, and it is the main muscle for flexing and bending. It is the main muscle for core exercises such as crunches and sit-ups.

So, what exercises, will help strengthen your core? Primarily we recommend yoga..http://www.springsyoga.com

and Pilates. We also know some private instructors if you need one. Just give us a call.


Dr. Saul and Staff


Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Internet Articles ,Kinetic Spine and Sports
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2012


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Research, Common Sense Say Conservative Treatments Before Spinal Fusion Surgery

The American Chiropractic Association (ACA), in response to a recent government report and articles calling into question the rise in spinal fusion surgeries in the United States, strongly encourages patients and health care providers to consider the benefits of a conservative approach to back pain. "Research supports the use of more conservative treatments as a first-line defense against pain. This sensible approach not only reduces health care costs but also may help some patients avoid riskier treatments altogether," said ACA President Keith Overland, DC. Dr. Overland's comments follow the release in October of a report from the HHS Office of the Inspector General showing that hospitals that purchased spinal devices from physician-owned distributors (PODs) had higher rates of spinal surgeries than the rate of hospitals overall. The report noted that many hospitals rely on the surgeon’s preference when making purchasing decisions, and in some cases those surgeons have a financial stake in the companies selected. OIG findings show that using a POD did not reduce costs and those hospitals that did generally saw an increase in the number of surgeries performed—indicating clinical decision may have been affected by the business relationship. A related article published on Oct. 27 in the Washington Post reports that spinal fusion surgery in the United States has risen six-fold in the past 20 years, from 56,000 in 1994 to 465,000 in 2011. The Post analyzed 125,000 patient records in Florida and found that half the rise in spinal surgery cases in that state involved patients whose diagnoses would not normally make them candidates for the procedure. The article added that Medicare estimates more than $200 million was spent improperly on spinal fusions in 2011 because a conservative course of treatment had not been tried first. Medical guidelines for back pain recommend the use of conservative treatments. Likewise, a JAMA article published in April 2013 encourages patients with back pain to first try conservative treatments--exercises, physical therapy, chiropractic or acupuncture—and resort to surgery only when less invasive options fail. However, a study published earlier this year in JAMA Internal Medicine confirms that many physicians don't follow guidelines and instead refer back pain patients to surgery or write prescriptions for powerful pain killers.  The latter is part of an epidemic problem of prescription drug abuse in the United States; the number of prescriptions filled for opioid pain killers--some of the most powerful medications available--has increased by nearly 50 percent in the past 10 years to 257 million. Unintentional overdose deaths involving opioids now outnumber cocaine and heroin deaths combined. "It's important today for patients facing spine surgery to do their due diligence and ensure no stone is left unturned. There are effective, more conservative treatments that help many patients each year avoid surgery, lessen reliance on addictive pain killers, and get back to their normal lives and activities," said Dr. Overland.


Author: American Chiropractic Association.
Source: ACAToday.com. October 31, 2013.
Copyright: American Chiropractic Association. 2013


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"I Get Around."


That iconic '60s song resonates deeply with the Beach Boys' Mike Love -- and not just because he co-wrote it. These days, it's also something of an ode to how his life has improved, thanks to chiropractic care. "In more than 50 years of performing over 100 shows a year, I've traveled by car, van, bus, train, plane and occasional boat," he says of the toll all that touring has taken on his body. "Chiropractors have helped me remain mobile and pain-free." That makes Love, who's a big supporter of the Foundation for Chiropractic Progress, one of the growing number of Americans who've turned to what the journal Chiropractic & Manual Therapies calls "one of the most frequently utilized types of complementary and alternative care by older adults." In fact, an estimated 14 percent of patients cared for by chiropractors are age 65 and over. And while many older adults seek chiropractic care for its high patient-satisfaction scores and relief from musculoskeletal pain, chiefly back and neck pain, that's not all they're consulting such doctors about. The same C&MT article also noted that chiropractors help manage patients' health conditions through lifestyle counseling, including exercise and nutritional support. As for the lead singer of the Beach Boys, whose biggest-selling hit, "Kokomo," reached number one in 1988, he still loves performing in front of audiences worldwide. "With my active lifestyle," he says, "I use regular chiropractic care as a complement to my daily practice of transcendental meditation and hatha yoga." To learn more about developments in senior chiropractic care, visit www.yes2chiropractic.org.

Author: NewsUSA.
Source: NewsUSA. November 4, 2013.
Copyright: NewsUSA. 2013


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Lower Blood Pressure With Flaxseed


Looking for a more natural, non-medication based solution to reduce and/or manage your blood pressure? New research suggests flaxseed has comparable results to current blood pressure medications. In a study of 110 participants, half were assigned to a group consuming 30 grams of flaxseed daily for 6 months and the other half to a group that did not consume flaxseed. On average, participants in the flaxseed group who had a systolic blood pressure (the 1st number in the blood pressure reading) of at least 140 mm Hg during initial testing experienced a 15 mm Hg systolic pressure drop. Those same individuals also experienced and a diastolic pressure drop (the 2nd number in the blood pressure reading) of 7 mm Hg. Participants in the non-flaxseed group experienced no blood pressure change whatsoever. Researchers state the study’s results are preliminary and more research is needed before they suggest people throw aware their blood pressure medication. However, as previous studies have also shown flaxseed to have beneficial effects on various cancers, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, inflammation and even hot flashes, incorporating flaxseed into the diet is becoming a no-brainer.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Hypertension, online October 14, 2013.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2013


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Mid-Life Diets Important For Healthy Aging

Data from the Nurses' Health Study, a report that followed more than ten thousand women from 1976 through 2000, suggests the diets of women in their late 50s and early 60s could be tied to their health later in life. Since many diseases start in midlife, it’s likely that a healthy lifestyle which includes a healthy diet in midlife can be a factor in developing diseases in later life. Data acquired during this study showed women with the healthiest diets in their late 50s and early 60s were 34 to 46 percent more likely to have no chronic diseases as compared with those women with the poorest diets. Although this study focused on women only, we would expect similar findings in men. It’s never too late to follow a healthy lifestyle to feel better and reduce your chances of future disease.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Annals of Internal Medicine, online November 5, 2013.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2013


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