Newsletter Archives > ChiroPlanet.com Monthly Health Newsletter: January 2014 Health Newsletter

January 2014 Health Newsletter


Current Articles

» Happy Holidays
» Brain Chemicals
» Adrenal Fatigue
» Your Core!
» Vitamin E Helpful In Treating Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease
» Chiropractic For Persistent Headache

» Common Knee Surgery No Better Than Sham Surgery?
» Young Becoming Slightly More Healthy - Barely

Happy Holidays

Its been an amazing year, and it went by very fast. I am learning to embrace the moment. To be grateful. To trust that all will be well and that we live inside something so remarkable that we cant even really explain it. Take a moment to smell the roses.

No matter what tradition you celebrate, we all want to wish you a happy and healthy holiday season...

Peace and good will toward all.

Dr. Saul and Staff


Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2013


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Brain Chemicals

Are you feeling more depressed than you think you should? Has your get up and go, got up and went? If so, you may be low in particular brain chemicals like Serotonin, GABA, Tyrosine or DPA.

Low Serotonin will make you feel like you are living under a dark cloud, while low tyrosine( an amino acid) will leave you feeling like you have the blah's. You may feel stressed out and could use some GABA (Gamma Amino Butyric Acid). GABA acts to make the body more tranquil.  If you feel too sensitive to life's pains, you may be low in endorphins. This can be raised by a supplement call DPA. The good new is that these supplements may work as well or better than the common anti-depressants you see on TV with less side-effects!

If you would like to find out more, call LIly and she will send you the brain chemical analysis worksheet.

All the best,

Dr., Saul

PS..My son is getting married on Saturday the 5th of October and I am excited!

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul, The Mood Cure, Julia Ross
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2013


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Adrenal Fatigue
Are you suffering with Adrenal fatigue? Here are the common signs.
1. Difficulty getting up in the morning.
2. Mid morning low.
3. You feel better after the noon meal.
4. You have an afternoon low.
5. You feel better from 6 to 9:30 pm and get a second wind from 11pm to 1:30am.
6. You feel better if you can sleep in an extra 2 hours in the morning.

Other common signs are low bloods sugar or hypoglycemia, craving sweets and/or salty foods, difficulty sleeping, lowered libido, taking longer to recover from illness or stress, respiratory problems that come back too soon, a feeling of overwhelm or mild depression and difficulty concentrating
There are multiple causes of adrenal fatigue, but the most common is prolonged periods of stress or acute injuries like auto accidents.

The good news is that we can help. If you think you are suffering from adrenal fatigue, call us to see if we can provide a way back to being the person you know yourself to be!

The most common groups of people who suffer from this are caregivers, social workers, police, doctors, nurses, single moms, lawyers and people working 2 jobs. Self employed people are likely candidates as well.
 

All the best,

Dr. Saul



Author: Dr. Steven Saul via Dr. James L Wilson
Source: ChiroEco No9 6/13
Copyright: Dr Steven Saul 2013


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Your Core!


Hi! This is so important, I may leave this up permanently!

Lets talk about Core strength. You hear this term a lot. So what exactly is your core? Here is what you need to know.

You are made of Bones, Muscles, Tendons, Ligaments, and Fascia. If there is a breakdown in any of these systems you will have a loss of function which will lead to pain and dis-ease. We evaluate your body to find out the source of the problem.


What are the Core Muscles named and why are they so Important?

 
The core is made of all the muscles that ultimately attach to the pelvis.  These muscles can be divided into two sections based on their anatomical functions. One provides stabilization and the others provide movement.

    1. Deep stabilization system
    2. Superficial movement system


Anatomically, the muscles that are deeper in the body work more to stabilize the pelvis and spine, and the muscles that are located more superficially are more important for moving the pelvis and spine.

1. Deep Stabilization System


Core Training places a lot of emphasis on working the deep muscles of the core. Research shows that the deep muscles contract first before any movement is initiated. The body is brilliant!  It is wired to be stable first before it engages action.

The deep muscles are close to the spine and pelvis and they can help to move the body, but their primary role is to stabilize the pelvis and lower back. This protects these areas and gives you a strong foundation for the upcoming activity.

The core muscles that make the deep stabilization system are:

The transversus abdominus is one of the most important core muscles. It attaches to the pubic bone and fascia in the front. It compresses the abdominal contents, thus adding stability to the lower back and pelvis.

The lumbar multifidus runs on an angle and it helps with rotational stability. Research shows that people with chronic lower back pain have significant atrophy (wasting away) of the multifidus.

The pelvic floor muscles connect the sacrum and pelvis to the pubic bone. Their primary job is to stabilize the bottom of the abdominal cavity. The pelvis floor works with the transversus abdominus and multifidus to stabilize the pelvis. Kegel exercises are a great way to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles.

The diaphragm is the main respiratory muscle. It attaches to the ribs and spine. The diaphragm also forms the roof of the abdominal cavity, so it stabilizes the top of the abdominal cavity.

The internal oblique is the deeper of the 2 oblique muscles. It runs on an angle from the pelvis up to the ribs. Its primary role is in stabilizing the core, but it also helps to move the spine.

The transverso-spinalis muscles focus on segmental stability of the spine because they span just a few vertebrae in length. These muscles are also important for rotational stability.

All of the deep core muscles are important. When you perform exercises that require your spine to be stable, you challenge these core muscles. The plank exercise  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kiA9j-dR0oM, bridges, alternate arm and leg raises, and the drawing in maneuver are examples of exercises that can increase core stability. Any exercise or piece of equipment that requires your muscles to work harder to keep your spine stable will increase the muscle work in the deep stabilization system of the core.

2) Superficial Movement System


When the pelvis moves, the hips move, and when the hip move, the lower back moves. If the pelvis is stable, the lower back and hip are stable, so any muscle that attaches to the pelvis is part of the core as well.

The latissimus dorsi (lats), which helps you do pull ups, is most often thought of as a back and shoulder muscle, but it also attaches to the upper border of the hip bone, (pelvis), lumbar vertebrae, thoracic vertebrae, and ribs. The lats can help to tilt the pelvis forwards or to the side, and it can negatively affect lower back posture when tight and inflexible.

The erector spinae are the group of muscles that people most commonly think of when they talk about lower back muscles. They are a group of superficial muscles that run the entire length of the spine. As the name suggests, these muscles help to keep the spine erect and they also pull the spine backwards. Every lower back exercise will place some emphasis on the erector spinae muscles.

The iliopsoas is the main hip flexor muscle. It attaches to the front of the lumbar spine and pelvis. It is primarily responsible for bending the hip, but it can also help to stabilize the pelvis, lower back, and hip.

The adductors are the muscles of the inner thigh. Most people don't think of the inner thigh muscles as core muscles, but all of the adductor muscles attach to the pubic bone, which is the front part of the pelvis. Because they attach to the pubic bone they can help to stabilize the pelvis, especially when standing on 1 leg.

The hip abductors (gluteus medius and minimus) also attach to the pelvis. The gluteus medius and minimus are very important for hip stability, and they are especially important for stabilizing the hip and pelvis when standing on one leg. This is one of the reasons I say that balance exercises are so important in core training.

The hamstrings are the muscles on the back of the thigh, and they attach to the bottom of the pelvis. Strong hamstrings can help to anchor and stabilize the pelvis, and tight inflexible hamstrings can pull on the pelvis and negatively affect lower back posture.

The gluteus maximus is the largest muscle in the body and it attaches to the back of the pelvis. It extends thigh at the hip, and assists in laterally rotating the thigh. It works with the hamstrings to move the pelvis and also helps to stabilize the pelvis. Bridges can be considered a core exercise because it works the glutes while keeping the spine stable.

The external obliques attach to the ribs and pelvis but they are located superficially compared to the internal obliques. The external obliques are designed slightly more for moving the spine than stabilizing, but the external obliques  also help to stabilize the pelvis and lower back.

The rectus abdominus (6 pack)
is probably the most popular core muscle. It runs down the front of the spine, and it is the main muscle for flexing and bending. It is the main muscle for core exercises such as crunches and sit-ups.

So, what exercises, will help strengthen your core? Primarily we recommend yoga..http://www.springsyoga.com

and Pilates. We also know some private instructors if you need one. Just give us a call.


Dr. Saul and Staff


Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Internet Articles ,Kinetic Spine and Sports
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2012


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Vitamin E Helpful In Treating Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease


In a new double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, randomized clinical trial involving 613 patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease (AD), Vitamin E was shown to slow the functional decline of Alzheimer's. AD affects approximately 5 million older Americans and is marked by irreversible, progressive deterioration in memory and thinking skills. In this study, mild to moderate AD patients received either 2,000 IUs of vitamin E daily or a placebo. Over the average follow-up time of 2.3 years, researchers estimated those patients receiving the vitamin E had slowed their functional decline in activities of daily living (ADLs) by 19%. ADLs include things such as making meals, getting dressed and holding a conversation. According to researchers, this translated into a delay in progression of mild to moderate AD by 6.2 months. Another significant finding was that caregiver time was reduced by approximately 2 hours per day in the vitamin E group. Previous studies have also shown Vitamin E effective in those with moderately severe AD. It's important to note that those considering vitamin E supplementation to treat AD only do so under the supervision of a physician as vitamin E can interfere with blood thinners, cholesterol drugs and other medications.


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JAMA. 2014;311(1):33-44.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2014


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Chiropractic For Persistent Headache


Most people are aware that chiropractors are experts in dealing with back issues. As shown in a recent case study published in the Journal of Chiropractic Medicine, chiropractors are also equally trained in successfully diagnosing and treating many cases of headaches. In this case study, chiropractic care was delivered to a 54-year-old woman suffering from chronic debilitating headaches for the previous 11 months. After just five chiropractic manipulative therapy and adjunct treatments over 6 weeks, the patient experienced resolution of the headaches. If you or someone you know if suffering from headaches, call your local chiropractor today for a no obligation consultation.


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Journal of Chiropractic Medicine Volume 12, Issue 4. December 2013.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2014


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Common Knee Surgery No Better Than Sham Surgery?


When going under the knife, the expectation would be to treat and/or cure a problem that can't be treated successfully through less invasive means. However, new research indicates that many surgeries involving the knee are often times no better than doing no surgery at all. In a new study, 146 patients aged 35 to 65 years with knee symptoms consistent with a degenerative medial meniscus tear where knee osteoarthritis was not present underwent either an arthroscopic partial meniscectomy or sham surgery. Fast forward a year after the real or sham surgeries and researchers found no significant difference between those two groups. Arthroscopic surgery on the meniscus, the cartilage in the knee joint, is the most common orthopedic procedure in the US. This study highlights the need to consider and try more non-invasive treatments prior to undergoing surgery, which has it's own associated risks.


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: N Engl J Med 2013; 369:2515-2524. December 26, 2013.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2014


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Young Becoming Slightly More Healthy - Barely

According to statistics among children and teens recorded over the last 10 years, kids are becoming healthier. Results come from surveys conducted on sixth through tenth graders taken in 2001-2002, 2005-2006 and 2009-2010. Improvements were seen in several areas including the number of days kids were physically active for at least 60 minutes, number of days they ate breakfast, number of hours of TV watched per day and the amount of fruit and vegetables consumed. Unfortunately, while the numbers improved, they did so only very slightly. Also, the percentage of kids considered obese from 2005-2006 through 2009-2010 did not change from 12.7%. So while we've seen a slight improvement in certain areas, researchers say there is still much to do and much room for improvement.


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Pediatrics, online September 16, 2013.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2014


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