February 2019 Health Newsletter

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Current Articles

» Posture
» Your Core!
» Stay Healthy
» Reduce Your Risk of Adverse Drug Events with Chiropractic Care
» Seniors: Eat More Vitamins, Lower Your Risk of Frailty

Posture  

Many of us are getting into terrible positions on our cell phones and computers. It is going to be more important than ever to make sure we get into good posture!

When I was growing up I was told "Chest out, stomach in, shoulders back, etc, etc". The problem is that following that advice caused a lot of tension in my body.

Here is how to get in good posture. Stand up. Allow you head to float up toward the ceiling. Or if you like, imagine that a hook at the top of your head is pulling your head toward the ceiling. Don't force it. Let is rise or float up.

Next, find the area under the front of your sternum (breastbone).  Its about the height of the crease of your elbow.

Now find your belly button. When you bend over, these 2 points will get closer. What we want is for these to points to get further apart!  This will naturally bring your shoulders back properly without tensing.

Thats it. Now you must practice this standing, walking and sitting. When you realize you are slumping, just repeat this process. Keep repeating for the rest of your life!

 

Dr. Saul

 

Author:Dr. Steven Saul
Source:Dr. Steven Saul
Copyright:Dr. Steven Saul 2015


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Your Core!  


Hi! This is so important, I may leave this up permanently!

Lets talk about Core strength. You hear this term a lot. So what exactly is your core? Here is what you need to know.

You are made of Bones, Muscles, Tendons, Ligaments, and Fascia. If there is a breakdown in any of these systems you will have a loss of function which will lead to pain and dis-ease. We evaluate your body to find out the source of the problem.


What are the Core Muscles named and why are they so Important?


The core is made of all the muscles that ultimately attach to the pelvis.† These muscles can be divided into two sections based on their anatomical functions. One provides stabilization and the others provide movement.

    1. Deep stabilization system
    2. Superficial movement system


Anatomically, the muscles that are deeper in the body work more to stabilize the pelvis and spine, and the muscles that are located more superficially are more important for moving the pelvis and spine.

1. Deep Stabilization System


Core Training places a lot of emphasis on working the deep muscles of the core. Research shows that the deep muscles contract first before any movement is initiated. The body is brilliant!† It is wired to be stable first before it engages action.

The deep muscles are close to the spine and pelvis and they can help to move the body, but their primary role is to stabilize the pelvis and lower back. This protects these areas and gives you a strong foundation for the upcoming activity.

The core muscles that make the deep stabilization system are:

The transversus abdominus is one of the most important core muscles. It attaches to the pubic bone and fascia in the front. It compresses the abdominal contents, thus adding stability to the lower back and pelvis.

The lumbar multifidus runs on an angle and it helps with rotational stability. Research shows that people with chronic lower back pain have significant atrophy (wasting away) of the multifidus.

The pelvic floor muscles connect the sacrum and pelvis to the pubic bone. Their primary job is to stabilize the bottom of the abdominal cavity. The pelvis floor works with the transversus abdominus and multifidus to stabilize the pelvis. Kegel exercises are a great way to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles.

The diaphragm is the main respiratory muscle. It attaches to the ribs and spine. The diaphragm also forms the roof of the abdominal cavity, so it stabilizes the top of the abdominal cavity.

The internal oblique is the deeper of the 2 oblique muscles. It runs on an angle from the pelvis up to the ribs. Its primary role is in stabilizing the core, but it also helps to move the spine.

The transverso-spinalis muscles focus on segmental stability of the spine because they span just a few vertebrae in length. These muscles are also important for rotational stability.

All of the deep core muscles are important. When you perform exercises that require your spine to be stable, you challenge these core muscles. The plank exercise† http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kiA9j-dR0oM, bridges, alternate arm and leg raises, and the drawing in maneuver are examples of exercises that can increase core stability. Any exercise or piece of equipment that requires your muscles to work harder to keep your spine stable will increase the muscle work in the deep stabilization system of the core.

2) Superficial Movement System


When the pelvis moves, the hips move, and when the hip move, the lower back moves. If the pelvis is stable, the lower back and hip are stable, so any muscle that attaches to the pelvis is part of the core as well.

The latissimus dorsi (lats), which helps you do pull ups, is most often thought of as a back and shoulder muscle, but it also attaches to the upper border of the hip bone, (pelvis), lumbar vertebrae, thoracic vertebrae, and ribs. The lats can help to tilt the pelvis forwards or to the side, and it can negatively affect lower back posture when tight and inflexible.

The erector spinae are the group of muscles that people most commonly think of when they talk about lower back muscles. They are a group of superficial muscles that run the entire length of the spine. As the name suggests, these muscles help to keep the spine erect and they also pull the spine backwards. Every lower back exercise will place some emphasis on the erector spinae muscles.

The iliopsoas is the main hip flexor muscle. It attaches to the front of the lumbar spine and pelvis. It is primarily responsible for bending the hip, but it can also help to stabilize the pelvis, lower back, and hip.

The adductors are the muscles of the inner thigh. Most people don't think of the inner thigh muscles as core muscles, but all of the adductor muscles attach to the pubic bone, which is the front part of the pelvis. Because they attach to the pubic bone they can help to stabilize the pelvis, especially when standing on 1 leg.

The hip abductors (gluteus medius and minimus) also attach to the pelvis. The gluteus medius and minimus are very important for hip stability, and they are especially important for stabilizing the hip and pelvis when standing on one leg. This is one of the reasons I say that balance exercises are so important in core training.

The hamstrings are the muscles on the back of the thigh, and they attach to the bottom of the pelvis. Strong hamstrings can help to anchor and stabilize the pelvis, and tight inflexible hamstrings can pull on the pelvis and negatively affect lower back posture.

The gluteus maximus is the largest muscle in the body and it attaches to the back of the pelvis. It extends thigh at the hip, and assists in laterally rotating the thigh. It works with the hamstrings to move the pelvis and also helps to stabilize the pelvis. Bridges can be considered a core exercise because it works the glutes while keeping the spine stable.

The external obliques attach to the ribs and pelvis but they are located superficially compared to the internal obliques. The external obliques are designed slightly more for moving the spine than stabilizing, but the external obliques† also help to stabilize the pelvis and lower back.

The rectus abdominus (6 pack)
is probably the most popular core muscle. It runs down the front of the spine, and it is the main muscle for flexing and bending. It is the main muscle for core exercises such as crunches and sit-ups.

So, what exercises, will help strengthen your core? Primarily we recommend yoga..http://www.springsyoga.com

and Pilates. We also know some private instructors if you need one. Just give us a call.


Dr. Saul and Staff


Author:Dr. Steven Saul
Source:Internet Articles ,Kinetic Spine and Sports
Copyright:Dr. Steven Saul 2012


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Stay Healthy  

Hi. I was thinking about what to say this month and frankly speaking there has been a lot going on in the world of healthcare. Debates about who should be covered. Who should pay? Is health care a right?

 

I dont pretend to have all the answers. I only have my opinion. The system is broken. Malpractice suits cause Doctors to charge more to then be able to pay the insurance premiums. Insurance companies are profit minded, not health minded. They want profits for their shareholders. The government is divided and uses the issue for its own political agenda. Its a mess and I am sure this is not news to you and merely a recap.

 

We need to consider and adopt strategies to stay healthy so you only need to use your health insurance in an emergency. What to do? Get Adjusted. Get Acupuncture. Get massages. Eat properly. Get some exercise. Drink plenty of water. Avoid artifiical stuff.

 

Please share with me how you plan to stay healthy and I will share your ideas in the next newsletter.

 

Happy Summer,

 

Dr. Steven Saul and Staff

Author:Dr. Steven Saul
Source:Dr. Steven Saul
Copyright:Dr. Steven Saul 2017


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Reduce Your Risk of Adverse Drug Events with Chiropractic Care  

If you are in chronic pain from back problems, you may be tempted to try anything to keep the hurt at bay. This might include taking addictive opioid pain killers or analgesics that have negative side effects.† These prescription drugs can cause "adverse drug events," which refer to any sort of injury or side effect caused by a medication.† Even scarier, the mortality rate from adverse drug events has been rising dramatically.† No one wants to die from a pain pill or end up addicted to it.†† The Good News: Adverse Drug Events Can Be Avoided The next time you are tempted to just medicate your back pain away, contact your chiropractor.† By getting comprehensive chiropractic care, you may be able to reduce or completely eliminate your dependence on prescription pain medication.† In fact, it's been proven to work.† One recent study showed that chiropractic patients had a 51% reduced likelihood of adverse drug events within 12 months compared to nonrecipients.† Comprehensive chiropractic care for back pain can include spinal manipulation and adjustments, pain relieving exercises, and other wellness protocols that are safe, non-invasive, and donít have those pesky and often dangerous side effects of drugs.† Reduce Pain with Chiropractic Care Today There is no need to risk adverse drug events when there is a safer option with chiropractic care. Contact us today for a consultation!

Author:ChiroPlanet.com
Source:JMPT June 2018. Vol 41, Issue 5, Pages 383Ė388
Copyright:ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


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Seniors: Eat More Vitamins, Lower Your Risk of Frailty  

A recent study has linked eating a vitamin-rich, balanced diet with a lower risk of developing frailty for adults age 65 and up. The research comes from the School of Medicine at Universidad de La Frontera in Chile.† The study looked at over 1,600 adults over the age of 65, none of which had developed frailty as they got older.† All of the participants offered in-depth information about their diet and food habits.† After the end of a follow-up period of about 3.5 years, 5.4% of participants (89 adults) had developed frailty.† Frailty is defined as a lowered amount of physiological health and functioning.† It often includes issues like fatigue, weakness, low activity, and slowness.† Most people expect older adults to develop frailty as a byproduct of old age, but frailty isn't totally age-dependent.† The Chilean study revealed that the seniors with the lowest levels of vitamin B6 at the beginning were 2.8 times likelier to develop some measure of frailty by the end of the research period.† This is in comparison with participants who regularly ate vitamin B6-rich foods like bananas, sweet potatoes, fish, tofu, and chicken.† Additionally, participants with the lowest vitamin E levels were 2.3 times likelier to develop some kind of frailty as opposed to those adults with diets rich in vitamin E.† Finally, the seniors who ate the least amount of vitamin C were 93% likelier to become frail than their counterparts who regularly ate vitamin C-packed foods like dark leafy greens, broccoli, and lemons.

Author:ChiroPlanet.com
Source:Age & Ageing, online July 25, 2018.
Copyright:ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


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